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  1. Finally got the rest of the parts in and finished the build on Wednesday. Stress tested and ready to roll. Now I just have to load all the sims, profiles, skins, etc. Basically a huge time suck and PITA, but it’s gotta get done. Hope to do some flying this weekend. It runs extremely cool and is a lot quieter than I thought it’d be. I have the RGB on for these two photos, but it’s annoying as hell in a dark room and goes into stealth mode most of the time.
    5 points
  2. Last Thursday night as we were sinking cargo and tanker ships in one of Cephas's missions, I brought up the anniversary of the sinking of the battleship Bismark. The song was made popular by Johnny Horton, who also sang many other songs quite well, like Battle of New Orleans. Someone on Teamspeak sang a little of that song, speaking of the bloody British, "well, they ran through the briars, and they ran through the brambles, and they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldnt go" I mentioned that Jimmy Driftwood wrote that song. My Dad loved old time mountain music, was an entertainer later in life, after he took medical retirement, and had time to travel and play music, until his COPD took his wind and energy, and cancer took his life in 1996. He liked to meet old time country entertainers, and asked to have his picture taken with them for a scrapbook, and to show his friends who he liked to hang out with. After Dad played Dobro on Jimmys old time country music show in Arkansas, he had a picture made with Jimmy. as he and mom, and moms sister and husband, hung out with Jimmy and his wife. Left to right, Jimmys wife, dads sister, my aunt, mom and dad. My uncle took the picture.
    5 points
  3. One of our inactive members is a friend of mine in the workplace. He retires this month and he gave me this image as a gift ( not sure why I was getting a gift for his retirement!). His dad was a P-38 pilot station in Panama during WW2 and this silhouette is him with his aircraft. His dad passed away a few years ago, but I did have the honor of going with him to the Sacramento airshow one year when they were going to have seven P-38's flying at the same time. I think in the end they only got four of them in the air that day but it was a great experience. Two stories about his dad The first was when his family offered to buy him a ride on a B-17 at one of the Heritage Flights locally. The response from a 90 plus year old retired P-38 fighter pilot....."Why the hell would I want a ride on a bus like that?" The second story was when I met his wife on the day we picked him up to go to the airshow. He had a very worn and dirty WW2 Vet baseball cap on. His wife stopped him at the door, took off the ratty old hat and brought out a brand new identical hat that she bought for him to wear to the show. He reluctantly took it from her. As we all climbed into the van and buckled up, he got this little smile on his face and pulled the ratty old hat that he had concealed in his back pocket and put it back on, smiling from ear to ear. I asked Chris for a little more of his service history, will share it here when I have it.
    4 points
  4. I just realized I am Gomez. I spend my time making virtual train sets and then blow them up with my friends.
    4 points
  5. Links: FaceBook: http://www.facebook.com/FagenFightersWwiiMuseum/ Web: https://www.fagenfighterswwiimuseum.org/
    3 points
  6. Mission released Latest mission just started, this one may take a little bit as it features the need to make precision strikes, in some cases where collateral damage can cause the objective to fail. (such as an attack on an SS HQ in the middle of Amsterdam. Some early pictures here of sub pen I made by stacking blocks. It looks pretty good except for the texture repeat patterning, but when you want something they won't provide for you, you have to make do. (and yes this is a valid skip bombing target for Mosquitos (even if we do not have the correct bomb type in game).
    3 points
  7. Found something that fit my springer bike now my bud Marley is the hit of the beach.
    3 points
  8. Why is that...other than the fact that social media is a dumpster fire in general?
    3 points
  9. JG1/4 piled onto the serve today in force.
    3 points
  10. Hope y’all are having a good one!
    3 points
  11. I hereby proclaim this is an official air show, now go watch the little bicycles with the overly loud engines…
    3 points
  12. Couple of shots of our camping area this past week. And a little something that shows how the wind can clear this of snow.
    2 points
  13. Mission rotation on almost all the Maps use the following rules: After one hour of inactivity (sometimes 30 minutes on smaller maps). The countdown clock heartbeat is reset every time a live player spawns or de-spawns or flies through an AI Checkzone (which are generally sprinkled all through the map) At sunset (where applicable) with a 30-minute warning of impending mission end and a final 5-minute warning. When either team scores 2500 points (hard coded into the .sds file). Points are only awarded upon mission ending so pilots that return to base increase this count greatly. 2500 is more than I have ever seen to this day although we did trip it at 1500 a couple times so I may lower it to 2000. *NEW - After completing a majority (approx. 75%) of the missions on the map a 1-hour timeout warning is given with a 15-minute interval countdown appearing in the top LH corner similar to the Difficulty Level notice in the bottom RH.
    2 points
  14. We will hit the newly revamped DE Arras north sector all planes tonight hope to see some of you there.
    2 points
  15. That would be the boss, just over 4k. Regardless we both needed the break and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves.
    2 points
  16. Sorry guys, won’t make it tonight. Got home early this morning from Sin City and still feeling pretty bagged, too much fun was had by all.
    2 points
  17. This mission covers the encirclement of Velikie Luki by the Russians, and the Germans attempt to relieve their units with a salient towards the city. The plane set for this map is the Yak-1/7, La5s8, Hurricane, Pe2, and IL2 '42. While technically this is a '43 mission it was barely past New Year's and this secondary battlefield did not receive the latest equipment. This is an objective orientated mission; you are tasked with trying to reduce the defenses of the two enclaves or stop the armored assault before it reaches the railyard. The targets in the defensive areas while not camouflaged are somewhat difficult to spot as they are dispersed among the buildings and also are protected by fairly stout AAA protection and random fighter patrols. There are barbed wire fortifications on the ground to mark the defensive position areas. A rearming base has been setup nearby the target zone to aid with the attack. No repair or fuel is available and if you de-spawn there it counts as being a forced landing for scoring. You must complete two of the three primary objectives before the armored column reaches the railyard area. A synopsis of the historical story is on the mission map below. Map of the actual battlefield and link to book available on Amazon. https://smile.amazon.com/Velikiye-Luki-1942-43-Fortress-Campaign/dp/1472830695/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2ERSMRUZYMVF7&keywords=the+doomed+fortress&qid=1656196118&s=books&sprefix=the+doomed+fortress%2Cstripbooks%2C119&sr=1-1
    2 points
  18. These great stories and others, (The giant killer), keep showing up in my facebook. I actually look for to using facebook to read these, not just to read about which of my nephews kids broke their arm.
    2 points
  19. Believe it or not, the keyboard, after being heavily flushed with warm water (with batteries removed) and thoroughly dried out in the hot summer sun for a day actually works as well as ever. Bullet dodged? I think so.
    2 points
  20. Due to a bug, the cockpit photo of the AR-234 and ME262 won't display, even if selected. However, here is the AR-234 photo for when it gets fixed. Its also in the vault, usual renaming applies custom_photoAR234.dds
    2 points
  21. So I finally have everything dialed in where I want it. Setting up keybindings (especially in DCS) is a chore I wouldn’t wish on my enemies, and VR tuning is a beast all on its own. Overall, the build went smoothly. I did have an issue that was caused in part by being an early adopter of DDR5, and the other part was me not doing enough research prior to purchase. As anyone who had built a computer knows, RAM can be a pain in the ass, and the cause of many issues down the line. Just looking up specs and trying to find the right combinations of speed/latency is daunting. But you also have to know how your preferred motherboard is going to interact with it once it’s installed. So I went with the fancy schmancy DDR5 6000 speed RAM; which came as 4 sticks of 16 GB each. The lack of research I mentioned earlier had me throw all four of them in there like Tim “The Toolman” Taylor…MORE POWER!!! It would’ve been just fine except for the fact that I wanted those advertised 6000 MT speeds. So I enabled XMP in the BIOS like any n00b! It worked; then didn’t work, then worked, then crashed, then stabilized, then crashed, etc. This was happening intermittently mind you, and it was also throwing GPU errors in the mix as a bonus. I googled the shit out of the GPU errors first and the majority pointed to system RAM as the root cause, but I’m smarter than them, and didn’t listen to that (because I’m truly a moron!) I ended up running my factory OC’ed 3090 at stock speeds, and it worked for a couple days before the errors started again. Started going down the RAM rabbit hole after that, and found several posts on Reddit that led me to something I should have known when I purchased everything. With these new motherboards and RAM kits, the BIOS’ are in the their infancy. They can supports the speeds advertised, but only with two DIMM slots, not all four. So I backed it down to 32 GB of RAM, and then went into a 24 hour stress test cycle with everything I could find, along with some help from the Reddit folks. Now I get advertised speeds on a rock solid system, and the GPU is running happily along at its advertised OC speeds. The lesson, as always, do your research before the build, lest you start pulling out hair you can’t afford to lose. I’ll hang on to this other 32 GB RAM kit and hope that the BIOS will eventually catch up, but right now, I’m just happy this thing is running as intended. She’s a real beast!
    2 points
  22. Right back at you, sir! Hope you're having a great day!
    2 points
  23. 2 points
  24. Well, what a day. Lots of great aircraft present and most of them flew. I was properly in propeller-head heaven. Some things I missed out on: - all of the parachutist displays were cancelled due to high winds (which also helped alleviate the 90+ temps, but also increased the need for extra hydration.) - The Fagen museum's latest acquisition, a Mitsubishi A6M3 Zero, did not fly. I could find nobody to give a reason, just speculation on everything from mechanical issues to licensing/insurance to pilot check-out. I did get pics. - The night time air show. By the time I got a few songs into the Eddie Montgomery concert, I was done. I got in my little Colorado pickup, cranked the a/c and the radio, and drove the two hours home. In case I hadn't mentioned it, I've got a torn meniscus, so the 13,000+ steps I got in yesterday did not help my pain level. - I didn't take any selfies. I've already been strongly admonished for this oversight, but... I prefer to be behind the camera, not in front of it. Actually, that's a lie. I did take one selfie from the bleachers watching Montgomery. I faked a smile but the cell phone camera took three ticks to snap the shutter; I couldn't hold the smile that long, so I've got a sourpuss face selfie. (My knee was killing me!) Spending my Father's Day morning sipping coffee and going through 1400+ images (those rapid-fire stills of passing aircraft add up!) Have several videos also, will go through those, maybe make a YouTube compilation. Have fiber, can upload! Lol
    2 points
  25. If you have the gun pods equipped your bombsight is your gunsight. If bomb equipped it is dive sight. Bind gunsight mode to a button and when in gunsight that will flip view 180.
    2 points
  26. This map has been updated with a second mission (choosing one disables the other) that is a placeholder mission for a Normandy simulation. The random convoy hunt is still available. UPDATES: Added dynamic difficulty to the convoy mission scoring. Added a new routine that allows you to extend the mission reset if you want to continue flying the mission after completing the primary objective. A message will tell you how many minutes you have to reset the clock by sinking another ship before the map resets. Added about 30% more ships to the invasion fleet and fixed a bad link causing the destroyers not to spawn. Fixed several bugs.
    2 points
  27. I have mine set to light up in sync with any sound. I used to be of the opinion that the lights were kind of pointless, but my opinion now is that the chassis lights a - help you see the inside of the system, and b - with the lights synching with the sound, it REALLY helps when troubleshooting (ie lights on, then the computer is seeing and processing sound, likely a speaker/headset issue). This has helped me on several occasions
    2 points
  28. And yeah, I have no idea why folks are so enamored with fancy lighting on computers these days. IMPO, frankly they're pointless. I'd rather have no lights and better (everything else). Because I'm not running the computer to look at it, I'm looking at the screens or VR goggles the machine is running. It's only because of cable length restrictions my main computer case is even on the desktop, it would normally be near the floor and completely out of sight. The only lights I've found partially useful are on my water cooler (an NZXT unit); it's lights on the CPU coolant block itself can be programmed to adjust according to the CPU temp. With the window in the side of my case allowing direct vision into the CPU area, that's a useful thing.
    2 points
  29. https://www.facebook.com/groups/139168989452694/permalink/5221193097916899/?ref=share
    2 points
  30. RELEASED 6/10 ABOUT THE OBJECTIVES: Upon mission start you will receive a briefing to attack the Bridge objective. This is a relatively easy but important time limited objective if you want to move the front lines. The Soviet defensive line is a tougher nut to crack (dynamic difficulty) but is also important to move the frontline. Watch out for a unique and dangerous flak unit here that a single large bomb might take care of. There is also a heavy tank supporting the defense, taking it out will greatly advance the effort. Along the road to Tuapse there are several objectives, most having to do with resupply of the troops. This also includes resupply efforts behind the mountain ranges. If you manage to defeat the bridge, the defensive line, and then disrupt all the supply lines in the rear the enemy front will collapse. The Hilltop Observation Posts are a side mission and a bit of a scavenger hunt. You are looking for a wooden tower and some tents. If you get close you might pick up some accurate smaller caliber AA fire, but don't spend all your time looking down because you are well within the Soviet CAP patrol area. There is a camp along the Tuapse road not too far from the LH Observation Post, do not confuse this with the Post. The camp is not a defined objective as it is only tents and not worth bombing. The Russians are not sitting idle will you attack them though, expect raids from time to time from Pe2, IL2, or A20's. Perhaps if you accomplish a high alt bombing mission against the bomber factory it may lessen that occurrence??? The Industrial Facility at Tuapse is another good High alt bombing target as well.
    2 points
  31. Map updated, the build is close to complete with objectives, I just need to finish tying objective rewards to front line movement. Make sure you take a full tank of fuel, flight times are a bit more than usual. There are some good long range bomber targets here as well if you can get past the patrols. (the Bomber factory is not shown at bottom) So far flying with several people online no major bugs have popped up although I just added a couple more objectives. I think we are good to go for Tuesday with this though.
    2 points
  32. Does this make WWBiker, Pugsly and WWSittingDuck, Uncle Fester?
    2 points
  33. Well, it's been my experience that the military will never acquiesce to having made an error in the delivery of it's munitions, so option i) is far more likely to see positive action. The positivity rate expected of the first option is such that (in this correspondent's opinion) it is highly unlikely to surpass 1%. There for, option #2 is is deemed a more actionable choice. (gawd ... using military double speak really does break one's mind... )
    2 points
  34. Was me who sang… or yelled in tune… or whatever
    2 points
  35. The trip... Well after the trip to Istanbul, I was itching to get moving. Zeus had blessed every tree in 20 miles and we were just waiting for some form of transport to our next destination. An RCAF supply flight was found to be lacking a pilot due to the regular pilot indulging a little too much from the local "delicacies". Expecting to be confronted with an old clapped out freight aircraft, I was presently surpised to see a C-47 awaiting my subtle touch as pilot. Zeus happily scrambled in the back and off we went to Malta. Weather was fair with some showers and winds, but the Dakota just made its way through like nothing, Malta landing went easily and I got the chance to meet George "Buzz" Bearling painting a new kill marker on his Spitfire. After a good rest and map study, we began out 8 1/2 hour flight to Gibraltar. Zeus slept in the back in between pumping extra gas from the drums into the tank access in the belly. He went crazy once while we were flying over the tip of Africa, not sure what he saw, but it took him a while to settle down... We landed at Gibraltar with no issues and began to look for our next transport. Ugh might have to be a boat as there was nothing in this area with the range to go overseas, oh well. C 47 flown in real time mode, Istanbul, Malta, Gibraltar in X-plane, real weather conditions. George Beurling paints more kill markings onto his Spitfire VC's fuselage. Published on June 10, 2012 RAF/RCAF pilot George “Buzz” Beurling was already an experienced pilot when he arrived in Malta on the eve of the opening of the battle for the island. He had come under a bit of a cloud, having disobeyed orders in flight over France when he had deserted his formation to attack an enemy aircraft, which he had shot down. Despite his victory, he was condemned by the squadron commander as not being a “team player” and thus, he volunteered for a posting outside of England to avoid punishment and further issues. He was soon sent to Malta, where he arrived on June 9, 1942, to serve with RAF No. 249 Squadron flying the Supermarine Spitfire VC. On June 10, 1942, exactly 70 years ago, the Seige of Malta began. With little warning, the Axis Powers of Italy and Germany commenced an intensive air campaign against the island. Over the next two months of fighting, George Beurling would rise to become the unrivaled star among the pilots defending Malta. He flew out of Takali Air Base, which was bombed heavily throughout the battle. Further, the island was isolated and poorly supplied — civilians and military alike were living on starvation rations. Yet for Beurling, his Malta posting was a dream come true — the ideal opportunity to hunt enemy airplanes. In just two months of fighting over Malta, he would become the leading ace in the Royal Canadian Air Force and become the highest scoring ace of the defensive campaign. During July 1942, in a single 14-day period, he set a record by destroying 27 German and Italian aircraft, damaging eight others and scoring three probable kills. Among those shot down during this period would be Italian Reggiane Re.2001s, Cant Z1007bis and Macchi MC.202s as well as several German Messerschmitt Bf 109s. That record of “kills” in air combat in such a short time is nearly unequaled in the entire history of fighter warfare (only German ace Werner Voss of World War I comes to mind). Beurling’s Tactics and Methods George Beurling’s tactics were elegant in their simplicity — he would engage the enemy without hesitation, instantly seeking extreme advantage. Once engaged, he would maneuver his aircraft to within as little as 250 feet from his target. To achieve this, he was known to throw the plane around the sky with violent maneuvers, doing whatever it took to get on the enemy’s tail. Then, typically using a deflection shot, he would “walk the gun sight” across the target’s line of flight and fire a relatively short burst with his guns (usually less than two seconds). His ability at aiming deflection shots was excellent (while most other pilots just spoke of getting hits on the airplane, Beurling would talk of aiming for the enemy’s oxygen bottles or fuel tanks). By maneuvering in so close, he set up his target so that it was hard to miss. The secret of his success was in his flying — and few could fly like Beurling in combat. As deadly as he was on offense, he was equally slippery in defense. When attacked from behind, rather than attempting to turn into the enemy and engage in a protracted dogfight, Beurling’s principles were to simply throw the plane into a violent accelerated stall and spin out of the fight so as to make good an escape. He knew that he would fly again an hour or two later and encounter more of the enemy; if anything, the air campaign over Malta was intense and unceasing. Beurling always sought and frequently established clear positional advantage before committing to a fight, allowing him to frequently attack enemy formations of much larger size. Undeterred, he would press his attack with supreme confidence in his abilities. It was during these attacks when he was sometimes shot down himself — which happened several times as he pressed his Spitfire into the fray against a numerically superior enemy force. Takali Air Base on Malta, heavily bombed by the Luftwaffe (Luftwaffe Reconnaissance Photo). Beurling’s combat spirit is best summed up in the award of his Distinguished Service Order medal, which described, among other engagements, his final mission over Malta, in which he unhesitatingly lead eight Spitfires against an enemy formation of eight Junkers Ju-88s and 50 fighters: What is missing from the award is the fact that Beurling had been trapped in the burning Spitfire as it had spun down from 18,000 feet. Finally crawling out onto the wing at 2,000 feet, he was able to leap clear at what he estimated to be just 1,000 feet. He opened his parachute at 500 feet and shortly afterward, hit the water. Floating in his Mae West, he was still bleeding profusely from his wounds when he was picked up by a launch from the island of Malta. Badly wounded and with a spreading infection from an explosive shell that had “nicked” his heel, he was ordered to be sent back to England for recovery. Even then, his trip back on a transport plane would be eventful — it crashed in bad weather at Gibraltar when the pilot overshot the runaway, attempted to go around and pancaked into the Mediterranean. Of the nearly two dozen on board, only Beurling and two others would survive. Beurling later wrote that he had recognized the impending stall and crash and so threw open the escape hatch. He leapt out of the plane just as it struck the water. He swam the distance to shore despite his combat injuries and new injuries from the crash itself. Beurling’s Personality and Hatred of the Nazis Many of his contemporaries would call Beurling a cold-blooded killer, a moniker that is perhaps a compliment when in war. A later reviewer (a USAF officer) noted that in terms of his personality profile, Beurling appeared to be “more accurately a frustrated, desperate man whose hatred for the enemy is reflected throughout the book in his vitriolic, disparaging remarks about the Germans.” Beurling’s hatred of the enemy also drove an unpredictability and explosiveness in his personality. This often got him in trouble with senior officers. He was rude, often intentionally misbehaving while counting his record in combat to insulate himself from significant punishment. He was never a team player, but rather sought out the enemy in a lone hunt whenever possible. The RAF’s and later RCAF’s difficulty of dealing with the hardened Beurling even manifested itself during his war bond tour while recovering from his injuries. Standing in front of the adoring crowds, he insisted on telling the crowds how much he loved killing the enemy. He enjoyed detailing the circumstances. In one recorded interview on Canadian radio during this time, he described the circumstances of one kill with extreme graphic terms (do not read if of a feint heart — but remember, this is a time of war and warriors have but one goal, to kill and defeat the enemy). He stated: Finally, unrepentant and continuously in trouble with his superior officers, he was forced into retirement from the RCAF in October 1944 (well before the end of the war). Beurling’s Retirement Considered With 32 victories to his credit, Canada’s greatest fighter pilot was retired from combat by men who were perhaps better suited to flying desks than fighter planes — their reasoning was that he was too unpredictable and refused to obey orders. In one event from earlier in his career that illustrates his undisciplined side, Beurling had been flying “tail end Charlie” at the back of a formation of Spitfires. Scanning the skies, he spotted a lone German Focke Wulf fighter in the distance. Knowing that if he called it out to the squadron that the leaders would take the kill, Beurling broke formation, closed on the enemy, shot the aircraft down and then returned to his position in the flight. None of his fellow squadron mates noticed his temporary departure from the formation. On returning to their base, the squadron reported no action for the day, but then Beurling stated that he had shot down an FW-190. The other pilots were incredulous. Clearly, he was lying — there hadn’t been a single enemy plane sighted, let alone engaged. Nonetheless, the intelligence officers developed his gun camera footage and were able to verify that indeed he had shot down the enemy plane. Despite his victory, he was still reprimanded for not being a “team player,” which instead simply prompted him to ask if he could be issued an American-made P-51 Mustang and given the mission of flying alone over enemy territory to hunt Luftwaffe aircraft. He was summarily turned down. His unmanageable behavior continued into 1944 as he struggled with the RCAF to be posted to combat positions, but his goal was always the same — he wanted to get into combat and kill the enemy. Thus, his forced retirement was a personal blow. Beurling was a man who was driven to achieve one thing, to kill the enemy in air combat. Undeterred, he drove south and tried to sign up with the US Army Air Forces in hopes of returning to combat over Europe. By then, however, the war was too far advanced and the need for additional pilots was much less than it had been even just a year earlier. Further, he was still in moderately poor health due to his numerous combat injuries. This counted against him in the review and he was rejected. With no other options, he returned to Canada to enter civilian life. Six months later, the war in Europe ended. A few months after that, in August, the war against Japan finally came to a close. Beurling faced a difficult adjustment to civilian life and peace. He had survived a terrible ordeal in combat, having been involved in no less than nine air crashes and surviving — he was shot down four times over Malta alone that eventful summer. Further, he had been unable to participate in the bulk of the combats in August due to starvation-induced illness and combat injuries — the privations of war weighed heavily on him. He was unforgiving of all around him and his hatred of the Germans continued to burn. During the war, he had lost his best friend, French-Canadian pilot Jean Paradis, and many other colleagues in combat. Perhaps in one of today’s military forces, he would be recognized as having a sort of post-traumatic stress disorder, but at that time, he was simply retired from military service and sent home to start a new life in peacetime. Soon afterward, his wartime marriage to Diana Whittal Gardner disintegrated. His personal relationships were strained and his family wanted nothing to do with him. Beurling’s Last Flight Finally, got his chance to get back into combat. In 1948, he volunteered to fly P-51D Mustangs for the new Israeli Air Force. He signed on a quickly traveled to Europe, where he met with another volunteer pilot, Moshe Cohen, who was another veteran of the battle over Malta during Beurling’s time. The two set about smuggling a Noorduyn Norseman cargo plane to Israel as part of their new duties the newly formed IAF. At Rome’s Aeroporto dell’Urbe, the plane’s engines inexplicably failed just after take-off. Trying to make it back to the runway, they crashed short and the fully fueled airplane exploded into a fireball. At the time, many thought it was sabotage, although the cause was never firmly established as the aircraft (and the pilots) were burned beyond recognition. The Italian military honored him with a proper military funeral fit for a hero, even if he had fought for the opposing side during the Malta campaign. He was so estranged that his family and widow failed to show up or even claim his body. Beurling’s remains were stored for three months in a cemetery warehouse before finally his widow ordered that he be buried there. Two years later, Israel claimed Beurling’s body as its way of honoring his sacrifice and volunteer service to the IAF for which he, like many of the volunteer foreign pilots who helped establish the IAF, had paid the ultimate price. With full military honors and a parade through the streets of Haifa, George Beurling’s body was laid to rest in a military cemetery at the foot of Mount Carmel with Israeli Air Force aircraft flying overhead in a salute while an honor guard stood vigil. Although for most Canadians his history and contributions to the RCAF are unknown, Beurling’s 1943 book, Malta Spitfire, has gone through several printings and remains an extraordinary read. His writing captures his battle-hardened hatred of the enemy and the challenges of the defense of Malta. Indeed, based on his book, there is little doubt that his hatred for the Nazis was intense, undimmed and the driving force behind his combat technique.
    1 point
  36. The map is complete and in the rotation and a pic is added to the initial post. The sub pen is a tough nut to crack! Please take the warning for the Veteran AAA area seriously.... For the SS Officers at the train station rockets are the best way to complete without causing collateral damage. There is a moving icon on the map that updates current train status for arrival at the Gouda train station to complete the objective.
    1 point
  37. The kill scoring link for the convoy was broken so it was not registering the damage we did so we probably would have had a victory last night, but still it was fun trying to stop that armored assault from advancing and we did delay it quite a bit. Looking at the stat results I cannot tell how many of the ground kills were from the column and how many were from the static defenses, but I am pretty sure they suffered about 50% casualties which would be devastating to a unit IRL. I was really surprised to see that our flight was about 70% attack aircraft last night, and although it is much maligned, I was glad to see the Pe-2 being used. It is a shame we do not have the TU-2 as mentioned last night, from Wikipedia: Even if they were just AI I would really like to see some more early Russian birds like the I-153, SDB-2 we had in -46.
    1 point
  38. The Night Witches ("die Nachthexen" in German) have returned to terrorize the night skies. This mission features the U2 biplane (with the Bristol F2B as a backup for those who do not own this collector plane) This is a dynamic difficulty mission and can be beaten with a single plane's stock loadout at level 1 if you are careful. Please read the briefing notes carefully for mission completion tips and computer setting advice for this night mission. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_Witches
    1 point
  39. Recently updated with large upgrade to enemy patrol randomness. New missions added:
    1 point
  40. Diz's Mossie (WWDarkdiz - MosquitoMkVIs2) is now available in the vault, and should be up on HSD once curated. Huge shout-out to Wolfie who did the engine cowling
    1 point
  41. I prefer Scotch, then bourbon or Irish, then vodka/rum/tequila, then beer. Possibly one immediately after the other, lol. @WWZed, this one's for you... PBY take-off and short flyby (pardon the wind noise... the wind was blowing pretty strong all day)
    1 point
  42. Thenit isn’t an airshow, maybe a bicycle rodeo….
    1 point
  43. 1.16 GB https://il2sturmovik.com/news/732/update-4706/
    1 point
  44. great poster.....really hoping I make the Reno Air Races this year. Has been a long, long time.
    1 point
  45. That looks like a LOT of fun!! Looking forward to your photos.
    1 point
  46. That is a badass photo!!
    1 point
  47. They are low performance, but we were still killing much more than we lost.
    1 point
  48. Peanuts got me through my childhood.
    1 point
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